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batye
batye
5/2/2018 11:23:29 PM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@srufolo1 yes, who cares as long as it serve in the emergency at the end... 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
5/2/2018 11:12:16 PM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@batye  I was shamed into not having a landline phone by people. Don't know why anyone would care whether someone has a landline phone or not. It gave me a sense of security that it would be there in case of an emergency. I'm happy I have a landline phone again.

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batye
batye
5/1/2018 2:31:54 AM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@srufolo1 do not feel bad, I still have landline and do not plan to get rid of it... as cell towers in my area is working bad... I prefer landline... 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
4/30/2018 10:55:30 PM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@JohnDrake I felt kind of silly myself getting landline installed last summer, but it was only because it was part of a Triple Play package. I have a Panasonic push button phone that I bought in the early 90s, and I consider THAT an antique. It finally broke because the buttons do not work anymore. So I can't even dial 9-1-1 if I had to. Guess I'll stick to my mobile phone in case of an emergency.

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afwriter
afwriter
4/30/2018 10:36:47 PM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@JohnDrake, That is an interesting anecdote. I wonder if there is a specific reason why people are having physical land lines installed? I have never had a landline in my adult life, though I grew up with one of the red phones that Joe talked about, and I could never imagine having one again. Even my retired neighbors just ditched their landlines in favor of smartphones. 

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Duh!
Duh!
4/30/2018 2:08:43 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Boom!
When reading this article, keep in mind that it's about commercial agendas on both sides.

If the operator is selling the service as "lifeline", all electronics needs backup power. The question is whether it's on the customer's premises or in the provider's infrastructure.

Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are proven technology. Short of extreme mishandling, they do not leak or explode. The big problem is that they need to be replaced and recyled every 6 years or so. For FTTH, that may mean a truck roll, or it may mean an unwelcome task for customers. For DSL, it does require a maintenance visit. All of that goes on the opex side of the ledger.

For lithium batteries, it depends on the chemistry, design and regulator. There were a couple of notorious incidents a number of years ago, when unproven Li batteries made by a company in Quebec exploded in a couple of AT&T's VRADS. Fortunately, nobody was hurt. IIRC, a fence was burned down.  Modern designs are much safer than that.

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JohnDrake
JohnDrake
4/30/2018 11:04:49 AM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
I bought the line for one thing: 911. So, don't need touch tone service on that line, and it gave me a chance to show off a collector's item I own (an art deco wall phone from before the US entered WW II). I had an interesting conversation with the installer. I asked if I was the only one in the state who was getting a new land line installed, and he said quite the opposite, that he had a hectic schedule installing such lines all over his territory. It sounded like an anomaly in the face of trends I am reading about, but there you have it.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/30/2018 10:58:45 AM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Beware Field of Dreams Syndrome
@darren: Fair points all. The fun part is when a totally different business comes down the line a few years later, invests in/buys out the failed then-innovative infrastructure, an reinvents and remarkets it to great success.

My dad has a saying for this: "There are no bad ideas--just bad timing."

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/30/2018 10:56:51 AM
User Rank
Gigamaster
Re: Feel silly
@John: I've used rotary phones and don't quite get even their nostalgic appeal. A fun toy, but when you really need to make a call, you curse your fate for every 8, 9, and 0 in the number.

My favorite: Those old, heavy, "I mean business" big red desk phones with the numbers on the front and the unscrewable earpiece and mouthpiece.

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darren.bindert@syscomm.co.uk
darren.bindert@syscomm.co.uk
4/30/2018 8:42:23 AM
User Rank
Narrowbander
Beware Field of Dreams Syndrome
Whilst I am a huge supporter of the progression away from copper and toward fibre, I also think that those of us in the industry sometimes get blinded to what our customers actual needs are versus what we'd like them to be.   

There's a good report from Liberty (https://www.libertyglobal.com/pdf/public-policy/Liberty-Global-Policy-Series-Connectivity-for-the-Gigabit-Society.pdf) that takes a closer look at both the supply and demand for fibre, what's happened in those countries that have aggressivley installed it.  More is not alwyas better, faster is not always the answer. 

It's clear that for those who are 'broadband-starved', any bit of improvement is welcome.  Indeed, it makes no sense to install copper where new lines are being laid.  But improvements in copper technology such as G.Fast will provide fast enough speeds for most households - and probably most Small to mid-sized businesses, particularly at the costs currently on offer.   

There are lots of benefits from an end to end fibre solution over and above speed, but just how much your average household will worry about latency rates, dedicated lines, etc is still unclear.   Businesses that genuinely need both the speed, privacy, dedicated nature and volume of upload / downloads that fibre provides will generally opt for a more bespoke solution.   

History is littered with businesses and technology that based their business model on the 'build it and they will come' philosophy.   In the end, customers always know what they need, irrespective of whether it suits our busness model or not.   

 

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